less than a minute to read
Gas turbines, also called combustion turbines, generate power using pressurized gas.

Gas Turbine

Definition

Gas turbines, also called combustion turbines, generate power using pressurized gas. This is achieved through a three-part process[1]:

  1. Air enters into the turbine
  2. A fuel source is burnt, generating heat. This heat causes the air in the turbine to expand, building pressure.
  3. The pressure of the expanding air turns a turbine. The motion of this turbine can be connected to a generator which creates electricity or harnessed and used for motion.
 
 

Context

Gas turbines are commonly used in transportation and in industrial processes, powering everything from planes and ships to heavy machinery[1]How Stuff Works (2015) "How Gas Turbine Engines Work"http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/turbine1.htm How Stuff Works (2015) "How Gas Turbine Engines Work"http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/turbine1.htm How Stuff Works (2015) "How Gas Turbine Engines Work"http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/turbine1.htm How Stuff Works (2015) "How Gas Turbine Engines Work"http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/turbine1.htm How Stuff Works (2015) "How Gas Turbine Engines Work"http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/turbine1.htm How Stuff Works (2015) "How Gas Turbine Engines Work"http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/turbine1.htm .

Gas turbines are a type of internal combustion engine.  This is because the air pressurization is done in the turbine by the burning of a fuel source. Another example of an internal combustion engines is a diesel engine[2]

Unlike many other types of turbines, gas turbines are ‘continuous combustion engines'. This is because the turbine is constantly pulling in fresh air, compressing it and using it to generate power[2]Langston and Opdyke (1997) "Introduction to Gas Turbines for Non-Engineers" http://files.asme.org/IGTI/Knowledge/Articles/13051.pdfLangston and Opdyke (1997) "Introduction to Gas Turbines for Non-Engineers" http://files.asme.org/IGTI/Knowledge/Articles/13051.pdfLangston and Opdyke (1997) "Introduction to Gas Turbines for Non-Engineers" http://files.asme.org/IGTI/Knowledge/Articles/13051.pdfLangston and Opdyke (1997) "Introduction to Gas Turbines for Non-Engineers" http://files.asme.org/IGTI/Knowledge/Articles/13051.pdfLangston and Opdyke (1997) "Introduction to Gas Turbines for Non-Engineers" http://files.asme.org/IGTI/Knowledge/Articles/13051.pdfLangston and Opdyke (1997) "Introduction to Gas Turbines for Non-Engineers" http://files.asme.org/IGTI/Knowledge/Articles/13051.pdf.

References

  1. a, b How Stuff Works (2015) "How Gas Turbine Engines Work"http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/turbine1.htm 
  2. a, b Langston and Opdyke (1997) "Introduction to Gas Turbines for Non-Engineers" http://files.asme.org/IGTI/Knowledge/Articles/13051.pdf

Sorry, we do not yet have a video specifically for Gas Turbine.  We are adding new  videos to StudentEnergy.org weekly, but in the meantime check out this video on Electricity.  

Take a Step Back

Power Plant

A power plant is an industrial facility used to generate electric power with the help of one or more generators which converts different energy sources into electric power.

Keep Learning! Progress To

Electricity

Electricity is the physical flow of electrons, referred to as an electrical current.

Steam Turbine

A Steam Turbine is a mechanical device that extracts thermal energy from pressurized steam and transforms it into mechanical work.